Friday, January 13, 2017

Fiction

I have come across a strange novel by Diane Schoemperlen, ``Our Lady of the Lost and Found: A Novel of Mary, Faith, and Friendship.'' Here are some quotes from the beginning:

This first stage of writing a book involves a lot of thinking time which, to the uninitiated, appears to be a lot of time wasted doing nothing more than looking out the window. --- p.28, Our Lady of the Lost and Found, Dian Schoemperlen
This is exactly the story of my past few years. Maybe I am writing a book without even knowing myself!?! :)

 ... Studying laundry on a line strikes me as a suburban version of reading palms, tea leaves, or tarot cards, a method of divination useful in determining not so much the past or the future but the present, which, to my way of thinking, is a state every bit as occult and enigmatic as the other two, requiring, but seldom accorded, equal measures of interpretation and exegesis. --- p.28, Our Lady of the Lost and FoundDian Schoemperlen
A beautiful interpretation of present and deciphering the meaning behind it. Small signs like this indicate that the author has felt something!! :)

And the following are quotes from the epigraphs of the book:

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The irony of writing about such an experience in the modern era is such that, if I say to people, ``This really happened,'' not unreasonably, they will be inclined to doubt me. They might suspect me of boasting, or assume that I have lost my mind. If I say, ``I imagined it, I made it up, it's fiction''---only then they are free to believe it.
                                                   --- Kathleen Norris, Amazing Grace

Ultimately, I have found it is meaningless to hold the yardstick of fact against the complexities of the human heart. Reality simply isn't large enough to hold us.
                                          --- A. Manette Ansay, River Angel
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--- p. xi, Our Lady of the Lost and FoundDian Schoemperlen
I love the sense of suspension of reality here.

Finally, this paragraph is filled with a hidden sense of sadness and heaviness:

Day after day, week after week, year after year, I went on with my life in the usual secular way: making meals, making beds, making books, making promises, decisions, and mistakes, making my own dogged way in the world, with all of these divine images stowed away somewhere in the intricate folds of my brain. They were like dream images, those ones that are so vivid when you first wake up in the morning, and then within minutes they begin to fade until, by the time you get the coffee made, they have disappeared completely and you are left with nothing more than an uneasy sense of having lost something but you cannot say what. --- p. 48, Our Lady of the Lost and FoundDian Schoemperlen


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