Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Clash of Reality or Ego?

Today is difficult. I feel that experiences like the one I had yesterday, no matter how wonderful and amazing, set me up for depression. As soon as I come back to the reality of the everyday world, BOOM,  I am overrun by the sudden fear of losing my mind, life, and everything within and without. And yet, at the same time, I feel like I am protecting an image, something that is not me anymore, and that is the driving force behind my sense of hopelessness and depression.

I do -not- like Deepak Chopra's view of the inner world, for the most part, but this short article on LinkdIn that I received in my email today made sense to me:

https://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20140421230152-75054000-career-curveball-how-i-learned-to-tame-the-ego

Here are some excerpts:

In India the right way for a person to go is known as their Dharma, and "right" means that the whole universe is organizing your way forward. To many people this sounds like a mystical idea, and yet all of us can say, at one time or another, that things turned out in an unexpected way beyond our control. The biggest obstacle to finding your Dharma is ego.

The ego stumbles to stay connected to a person's Dharma. You have to learn that your biggest allies along the way are instinct, intuition, staying true to yourself, standing up for your truth, and self-awareness. Your adversaries are naked ambition, blind competitiveness, self-importance, a craving for status, and following second-hand opinions as if they are your truth.
Most people are divided between their allies and their adversaries – I certainly was, and must confess still am, when I find myself in moments of struggle. The ego is a permanent part of the self, and a valuable one. But when it decides to run the show, your inner world becomes distorted. You start to live according to an image you want to protect rather than searching for the connecting thread – the Dharma – that subtly unites every moment of our life. What I learned from my career train wreck was to trust my allies, and as the years passed, one of them – self-awareness – became the ally I could rely on the most, no matter whether I was going through hard times or times of great fulfillment.

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