Monday, November 14, 2011

Beethoven - Cello Sonata - Glenn Gould & Leonard Rose

Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69. Composed in 1808.
Part 1:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GchB9unYkOE


Part 2:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1w2T7JMCxxg



Part 3:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XF15KPegFYY



Rostropovich & Richter - Beethoven: Sonatas for Cello and Piano (Edinburgh 1964)--- A 2 hour program!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ca4iYDlzYo8



Sviatoslav Richter approach to performance [from Wiki: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sviatoslav_Richter]

Richter explained his approach to performance as follows: "The interpreter is really an executant, carrying out the composer's intentions to the letter. He doesn't add anything that isn't already in the work. If he is talented, he allows us to glimpse the truth of the work that is in itself a thing of genius and that is reflected in him. He shouldn't dominate the music, but should dissolve into it." Or, similarly: "I am not a complete idiot, but whether from weakness or laziness have no talent for thinking. I know only how to reflect: I am a mirror . . . Logic does not exist for me. I float on the waves of art and life and never really know how to distinguish what belongs to the one or the other or what is common to both. Life unfolds for me like a theatre presenting a sequence of somewhat unreal sentiments; while the things of art are real to me and go straight to my heart."

Richter's belief that musicians should "carry ... out the composer's intentions to the letter", led him to be critical of others and, most often, himself. After attending a recital of Murray Perahia, where Perahia performed Chopin's Third Piano Sonata without observing the first movement repeat, Richter asked him backstage to explain the omission. Similarly, after Richter realized that he had been playing a wrong note in Bach's Italian Concerto for decades, he insisted that the following disclaimer/apology be printed on a CD containing a performance thereof: "Just now Sviatoslav Richter realized, much to his regret, that he always made a mistake in the third measure before the end of the second part of the 'Italian Concerto'. As a matter of fact, through forty years -- and no musician or technician ever pointed it out to him -- he played 'F-sharp' rather than 'F'. The same mistake can be found in the previous recording made by Maestro Richter in the fifties."

2 comments:

  1. Heavenly music and masterful performance! Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete

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