Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Trio Sonatas

I am listening to J.S. Bach's "Trio Sonata"s ... it is so peaceful, especially this performance that is somehow slower than the others I heard before ... if there is a heaven, J.S.Bach should be played there most of the time :)
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By human natural tendency to overdo everything, I looked up more performances of "trio sonatas" (JSB) on our "second" online music library (!), and to my surprise all of them were performed by one/two keyboard/piano/organ, but no strings, so I did a little search: [Source - wikipedia]:

The trio sonata is a musical form which was particularly popular around the 17th century and the 18th century.
A trio sonata is written for two solo melodic instruments and basso continuo, making three parts in all, hence the name trio sonata. However, because the basso continuo is usually made up of at least two instruments (typically a cello or bass viol and a keyboard instrument such as the harpsichord), trio sonatas are typically performed by at least four instruments.
The melody instruments used are usually both violins. A well-known exception is the trio sonata in Johann Sebastian Bach's The Musical Offering, which is for violin and flute.
Johann Sebastian Bach's trio sonatas for organ (BWV 525-530) combine all three parts on one instrument. Typically the right hand, left hand, and pedals will each take a different part on a different sound, thus creating the same trio effect.

3 comments:

  1. You are just so right. I cannot stop listening to it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Why don't you have a weblog? it has proven to be useful for "qual exams" :)

    The nice thing about Bach, and in general classical, music is that you can re-discover a piece many times ... in fact, yesterday i listened to these sonatas after a year or so and was pleasantly surprised ...

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  3. I have a few weblogs, none of which is really active!!!

    This is what chambana people and some other friends of mine sometime read:
    http://shedai.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete

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